sewer line repairThe young couple finished the basement first. Since the entire home needed to be refinished, the plan was to complete all of the work in the basement and stay in that space while they finished the upstairs. The results were looking great. The navy and gray striped nursery for the three month old looked like a design in a catalog. The large living space features a whole wall plasma television that was the gathering place for football weekends. The wall to wall carpet made the space warmer and tied the entire area together. It was a great space and a welcome location after a long day at work or an even longer day working on finishing the upstairs space.

A great space until the week before Thanksgiving. The first indication that something that was wrong was the smell. The walk to the basement confirmed the problem. The new carpet was soaked and the water had started to seep into the drywall. A sewer line repair service found that roots from the large tree in the front yard had worked their way into the 30 year old sewer line, backing the water and sludge into the newly finished basement space.

Luckily, although the carpet and padding had to be torn up and replaced, the repair did not require digging up the front yard. The trenchless pipe repair began with a sewer jetter that blasted the tree roots out of the entire system. The following trenchless repair did not require excavation of the basement floor or the front yard.

Tree Root Systems Can Cause Major Sewer Line Problems

While mature trees in the front yard provide both beauty and shade, the root systems can create expensive sewer line repair problems for home owners. In fact, most of a tree’s root system grows 12 to 36 inches below the surface of the soil. They can also extend horizontally two to three times the diameter of the width of the leaves and branches. Unfortunately, these long, extensive root systems often intersect with underground pipes. The roots are so powerful that they can break or crack aging sewer pipes. In the past, these roots might have required the complete excavation of the sewer system. Trenchless sewer work, however, has eliminated the need for tearing up yards, sidewalks, basement floors, and landscaping.

The Cost of Trenchless Sewer Repair Can Seem More Expensive

Initially, trenchless options can cost anywhere from 30% to 50% more than conventional sewer repair that involves digging. In the long run, however, trenchless sewer line repair can actually be more cost effective. This method that avoids thousands of dollars in restorative work, can also be completed in a much shorter time frame than traditional sewer repair. In fact, some trenchless repair work can be completed overnight or over the weekend without ever interrupting regular business hours. This is another savings that can make the initial cost of trenchless repair affordable.

Also known as cured in place pipe repair, this technique works with pipe diameters that range from as small as two-inches to 102-inches in diameter. The trenchless sewer line replacement material has a warranty that lasts as long as 100 years. Long used in commercial projects, trenchless methods have been available for residential jobs for the last 15 years.

Only the Most Informed Home Owners Know of the Most Advanced Methods

While nearly 78% of Angie’s List customers say that they have never heard of trenchless repair, once the process has been explained the same percentage say that they would be interested in a repair that did not require expensive excavation and restoration. One in four of the Angie’s List customers say that they have already had to pay for expensive sewer repair, and an additional 3% say that they expect to complete sewer work in the near future. In fact, any home older than 40 years of age should have a sewer inspection to avoid expensive sewer emergencies.

Home owners who find themselves facing sewer line repair projects should make sure that they consider all of the options before making a final decision. The most prepared home owners, in fact, know that a proactive sewer inspection every few years may help them anticipate possible future problems.